Chris Lewis

 
 


Creating sculpture was a natural outgrowth from advertising illustration.  Although both professions are outlets for creative expression, illustration is inherently limited by the need to sell a product, whereas fine art allows the exploration of personal objectives.


My pieces are hand built using slab, coil, or pinch pot construction. I manipulate the wet clay to shape the form, then create texture, and accentuate the finished product with layers of shading and color. I sometimes incorporate other media or found objects.    My pieces are usually fired multiple times, both high and low, atmospheric and electric; incorporating a variety of surface treatments.


My work is figurative; symbolically, and often humorously, representing questions and contradictions. Inspiration comes from my struggle to understand and face the conflicts and dilemmas in my personal life as well as in the world at large.  My work is often described as whimsical and humorous, but with an edge.  While the physical process of creation is intensely personal, the end result connects me, emotionally, with the viewer. 

 
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I grew up in a small farm town in the Florida Panhandle nowhere near the                    beach. I received my BS degree from Florida State University in Art Education in 1972.  Having no affinity for teaching, I moved to Atlanta to pursue a career in Illustration.  After stints as an art director, first at Turner Outdoor, and then at Weltin Advertising, I became a freelance illustrator.  During my fourteen-year career I developed a national client base, which included Fisher Price Toys, CBI Equifax, Texaco, Coca-Cola, American Express, Family Circle Magazine, and Kimberly Clark. 


In the early 80’s I retired from Illustration to take the lowest paying, most under-appreciated job of my life, as CEO of My Home, Inc. I dabbled in clay, taking classes and attending workshops that stressed form and technique as well as conceptual development, from teachers such as Glenn Dair, Diane Kempler, Red Welden, and Debra Fritts.  My sculpture was represented in Atlanta by Aliya Gallery until the gallery closed.  I exhibit extensively throughout the southeast.